Tag Archives: slum

Hope for Life Breakfast

Breakfast Invitation 1Come join us for breakfast, while we hear from our guest Nkurunziza Francis (Co-founder & Director of Hope for Life Katanga) as well as the rest of the Hope for Life team from the UK.

Francis will share a little about his background growing up in Uganda, before talking about the exciting work we are currently doing in Katanga (& beyond?). Francis, Megan and Mark will be sharing stories, pictures and videos throughout the morning.

There will be a time for Q&A at the end too, all while you enjoy a cup of coffee, croissant and perhaps a Ugandan chapati.

There will be a crafts area in the hall, as well as lots of outside green space if the children (or adults) want to run about.

Please register that you are coming to the breakfast by ‘purchasing’ free tickets from our event page.

We would love to see you there.

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News report on Katanga and the work we do

Check out the news report below of us on National TV in Uganda. The ‘Slum Report’ describes the poverty in Katanga and the work we are doing to help combat it.

#MatchitMay is now over

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#MatchitMay is now over, 31 days of matching money spent on your chosen item. Megan and I (UK co-founders) have just donated our matched money to our online fundraising page…

If you have been taking part in #MatchitMay then head on over to our fundraising page to make your donation.

Thanks all for taking part, your donations will really benefit the lives of many in Katanga Slum, Uganda

https://www.goldengiving.com/fundraising/MatchitMay

Livelihoods building renovation

Since early 2013 it was quickly becoming clear that we needed to purchase another building for our Livelihoods work. We had been using our Education building for parent workshops and classes but we were struggling to fit these classes alongside the children’s catch up classes.

So during last year we bought another building in Katanga that we have now started to renovate for our Livelihoods project. We want to be able to empower adults in the community in earning a self sustaining income. We currently do this by teaching money management, business management and practical workshops that will help them to find new skills or further existing skills, which will assist individuals in running successful businesses.

We want to have a purpose built building that will be able to strengthen our Livelihoods work and be able to transform the lives of many lives in Katanga.

Below are a few pictures of the renovation so far…

The pictures below shows some of the Livelihoods work in action, whether it is in the blue catch up classes, on the pathways of Katanga or in individuals homes.

We are so excited for the potential that this building offers. The women, who we have given loans to, are now using the building to repay their loans and are also just as excited as we are to set up the sewing machines in the new building.

Our Livelihoods officer has busy planning and organising all the activities/workshops/trainings etc. that we will offer to Katanga residents when the building is complete, workshops including tailoring, catering, craft making, hairdressing.

We are now eagerly waiting tables, chairs, blackboards and cupboards so we can start using the building properly.

Thanks to all those who have helped donate towards the work we are doing in Katanga.

Day 7 – Mosquito nets

Malaria is a huge problem in Uganda, with Mosquitoes all around the country carrying the infectious disease. Mosquitoes particularly inhabit and breed in warm, stagnant water. The drainage and general sanitation in Katanga is very poor and so there is not a shortage of stagnant water, and as a result, mosquitoes in Katanga.

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The best way to protect yourself from the bite of a mosquito is to have a special net over your bed that mosquitoes can’t get through.

Many families in Katanga can not afford to buy a net, despite understanding the importance of protection, despite having friends and family die because of malaria.

Every Ugandan I speak to is very flippant about a new case of malaria, saying things like, ‘I have had it 3 times this year already’. They are flippant, not because malaria is not very serious, but because it happens so frequently to Ugandans all around the country.

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There are different strains of malaria, some that can kill in hours and other strains that providing you get the correct medication you will be able to get better.

The problem with handing out mosquito nets is you can’t just hand them out to everyone. People are well known for taking the mosquito nets and then selling them on to others for a quick financial gain.

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As part of working with the families we get to know their home situation, including things like whether they sleep under a net or not. Our continued relationship with them means we are able to do regular checks on the family to ensure the nets are still up in their house to ensure prevent them from selling them on.

We give nets first to those who are the most vulnerable to being affected by malaria e.g. pregnant women and children. The malaria nets we give out are ‘family nets’, which means you can put 1 over a mattress and that will cover as many as 8 children each night. The nets cost only £5 per month but are worth so much more than that in lives saved and cost in medication each time they get ill.

If you are interested in donating into out Health program, to buy more mosquito nets for families in Katanga then you can give to Hope for Life at £5/net on our donate page.

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You can read our last post on giving out new dresses to children in Katanga… Day 6 – Dresses

Mamma Akram and her family

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It was great to sit with Mamma Akram and Family this afternoon, whilst they all were pulling off the wings and legs off Grasshoppers ready for frying (a tasty treat, even if it takes a while to get over the fact that your eating a bug!).

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We were chatting swapping stories about each of our families and lives, when I asked how much she was to earn from her family pulling these legs and wings off?

She replied, ‘300 shillings per cup and we have now done 3 cups’.

The family had worked together to get 900 shillings that day, which totals to 23p. 23p that 5 people had been working for. I asked why the boys were helping and why they were not playing football or something else, she then replied, ‘because they know that if they do not work then we do not get money to feed the family tonight’.

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A harsh reality from the lives of people who live in Katanga Slum.

First children going to formal school

Since Megan and I went to Katanga for the first time in September 2011, we have been dreaming about giving children in Katanga slum a chance to an education. Ever since then our trustees have worked hard at hiring teachers, recruiting volunteers; working hard to see us achieve this goal.

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From an early stage we wanted to find away to get these children into a school where they are able to have the opportunity of receiving a good education for their future. We decided it would be great to find willing people from all around the world to partner with us in sponsoring a child to go to school for £20/month.

We had one big problem, as the children had not received education before we needed to get them to an academic level where they would be able to pass a school entrance exam, and have a good understanding of basic subjects that they will be taught in their new school.

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We then started our small school in Katanga slum, teaching these children until we thought they were ready to attend school and when we had found sponsors for them.

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In Uganda the school year runs from January to December. This January we enrolled our first 3 children into a formal school, they all passed their entrance exam and are enjoying going to their new school.

schoolHere is a picture of James, Christine and Alex looking smart in their new school uniform at their new school.

These 3 children leaving our Hope for Life school means we can receive another 3 children from Katanga slum who vitally needs education.

If you would like to find out more about how you can sponsor a child like these 3 above then fill out the form below. You can also visit our ‘Sponsor a Child’ web page to find out more.

Merry Christmas & A Happy New Year

Merry Christmas to you all, we hope you have had a great time perhaps seeing your family & friends, eating some good turkey and sharing lots of gifts with each other.

We finished the school term in December with an end of year Christmas party with all the children in our school, the teachers and Ugandan trustees too.

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& A Happy New Year. We in Uganda are looking forward to a new school term in January with some more new faces. A few of a children have acquired the sponsors necessary to send them to a private school, in Kampala. These children have studied hard, have really got to grips with learning and have shown real improvement in the last year in the Hope for Life school.

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Both our teachers and social workers have worked hard, over the past year, to ensure the children are at a standard where they are able to attend formal school and pass the entrance exam.

As we have some children leaving our school, we will have more space in our classes to welcome in more children, from Katanga slum, who can not afford & need education.

IMG_7711Tendo (the girl in orange), who goes to the Hope for Life school, with her friends; all who have never received any formal education.  

We want to thank all of those people who are currently supporting our teachers to teach the children in Katanga, to a level where the can attend formal school. We are also thankful for those who are sponsoring children to start school in January 2013.

If you would like to know how you are able to support a teacher or sponsor a child then fill out the form below and we will get back to you as soon as possible.

Education Livelihoods Health Water

Hope for Life started in Katanga Slum giving Education to 15 children. We wanted to invest in these children’s future, helping them to attain more in their lives. Our goal is to provide a basic level of education in our school, to get them to a level where they are able to attend school themselves. We would then find people to sponsor this children to attend a local school for them to get their accredited education.

We then decided that it was great to invest in the child’s future but the parent needs to earn money to feed the family today, not just in the future. So we started up the Livelihoods project looking at ways we can support and encourage the families in earning money and supporting their families.

The Livelihoods project still has a time frame attached to each family; time to learn the theory of how to run a business and money management skills, time to then actually run a successful business to be self sustainable and earn enough money to provide for their families.

Whilst we were working with these families we has instances where a boy in our school broke his leg (a collision with a motorbike), another boy in our school and his younger sister got very serious 3rd degree burns (the boy is still alive but the 1 year old girl died whilst Megan and I were in Uganda in August 2012), various children and members of their families were still getting ill with Malaria and other diseases.

We then started thinking about the project Health to help with these situations. With the aim to produce malaria nets, medical help from trained nurses and doctors, an emergency medical fund, which means we can pay for life saving treatment when there are serious illnesses and injuries with the families we work with. Education also plays a huge role in the health of the Katanga residents, so we look to address these issues in our school and Livelihoods program.

Our whole ethos at Hope for Life Katanga is to be a support to the families, helping them to earn money for themselves to be able to provide for their own families. The last thing we want to do is to give money to the families as we know this is a short term fix to a long term problem. The only exception is when a family we work with has a life threatening, or serious, illness or injury.

A huge part of bad health is dirty, stagnant Water being the main problem for diarrhoea, malaria, cholera, E.coli, typhoid, salmonella to name a few. For as long as people are forced to drink, bathe and live around dirty water then they continue to get ill. We are currently doing some research into the cleanliness of the water, before we know what to filter/safe guard against.

Making dresses for girls around the world

Yesterday we came back from a charity dress making day at Cordial and Grace in Bristol. We got taught how to make the dresses that the charity ‘Dress a Girl Around the World’ would send to clothe those who need them throughout the world (as the charities name suggests).

The dresses are made from a simple pattern design, usually out of pillow cases, altered to fit various aged girls. We had fun learning to sew, chatting, drinking tea and eating cake. It was a great feeling knowing that you were making clothes for those in the world who need them.

On our recent trip to Uganda we took about 50 dresses and 20 shorts that people from all around the UK had made. The children in Katanga Slum absolutely loved their new clothes and they really appreciated people making the dresses for them.

The girls in Katanga Slum just after putting on their dresses.

If you want to find out more about the charity ‘Dress a Girl Around the World’ then you can click here for their website or here for their Facebook page. It is great to see the dresses being sent to those who need them and we are looking forward to going out to Uganda again to take even more dresses.

Day 14 – Homes

As you have seen in plenty of pictures, the houses in Katanga slum are well below a satisfactory standard.

On the link at the bottom of the page there are some more picture showing the various houses where people live in Katanga;

some have sewage water running past their door,

some are made of mud and sticks,

some of clay brick,

…read more about the house in Katanga Slum here… https://hopeforlifekatanga.com/day-14-homes/

Day 12 – Sleeping

By day 12 we had obviously slept quite a lot but one night was very different, and ironically didn’t really involve much sleeping.

Megan and I really wanted to get a taste of what it is like to live in Katanga Slum, by staying the night with a family that attend our school. We would not only stay a night but also join the family in what they do throughout the day; eating, playing, drinking, bathing and washing clothes. Before we stayed the night we didn’t tell the family we would stay with them, we didn’t want them to prepare for us e.g. tidy-up, buy nicer foods.

Check out the rest and more pictures by following the link below…

https://hopeforlifekatanga.com/day-12-sleeping/