Tag Archives: water

Katanga Video

Below is a short video that gives you a good overview of Katanga, an urban slum in Uganda, and the work we are doing to help the community.

Check it out…

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Day 7 – Mosquito nets

Malaria is a huge problem in Uganda, with Mosquitoes all around the country carrying the infectious disease. Mosquitoes particularly inhabit and breed in warm, stagnant water. The drainage and general sanitation in Katanga is very poor and so there is not a shortage of stagnant water, and as a result, mosquitoes in Katanga.

Health

The best way to protect yourself from the bite of a mosquito is to have a special net over your bed that mosquitoes can’t get through.

Many families in Katanga can not afford to buy a net, despite understanding the importance of protection, despite having friends and family die because of malaria.

Every Ugandan I speak to is very flippant about a new case of malaria, saying things like, ‘I have had it 3 times this year already’. They are flippant, not because malaria is not very serious, but because it happens so frequently to Ugandans all around the country.

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There are different strains of malaria, some that can kill in hours and other strains that providing you get the correct medication you will be able to get better.

The problem with handing out mosquito nets is you can’t just hand them out to everyone. People are well known for taking the mosquito nets and then selling them on to others for a quick financial gain.

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As part of working with the families we get to know their home situation, including things like whether they sleep under a net or not. Our continued relationship with them means we are able to do regular checks on the family to ensure the nets are still up in their house to ensure prevent them from selling them on.

We give nets first to those who are the most vulnerable to being affected by malaria e.g. pregnant women and children. The malaria nets we give out are ‘family nets’, which means you can put 1 over a mattress and that will cover as many as 8 children each night. The nets cost only £5 per month but are worth so much more than that in lives saved and cost in medication each time they get ill.

If you are interested in donating into out Health program, to buy more mosquito nets for families in Katanga then you can give to Hope for Life at £5/net on our donate page.

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You can read our last post on giving out new dresses to children in Katanga… Day 6 – Dresses

Testing water in Katanga

Working with the University to test various samples of water in Katanga Slum. We are having lots of meetings with the local council, various water charities and water engineers to find out if we can improve the water and sanitation issue in Katanga. Find out more about our water program by clicking here.

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World Water Day

Today is world water day, a day of raising awareness of the importance of safe, clean drinking water for the people in this world.

Katanga Slum is home to 20 thousand people who live daily without clean water, not only that but they live with streams of dirty sewage water, running past the front doors of their homes. These streams inhabit various waterborne diseases e.g. Malaria and Cholera that can cause serious ill health to people who even live near these waters.

We at Hope for Life Katanga are doing all we can, fighting against thousands of people drinking, bathing or cooking with dirty water.

1 Billion people live without clean drinking water.

See how clean water can change lives throughout the world..

Education Livelihoods Health Water

Hope for Life started in Katanga Slum giving Education to 15 children. We wanted to invest in these children’s future, helping them to attain more in their lives. Our goal is to provide a basic level of education in our school, to get them to a level where they are able to attend school themselves. We would then find people to sponsor this children to attend a local school for them to get their accredited education.

We then decided that it was great to invest in the child’s future but the parent needs to earn money to feed the family today, not just in the future. So we started up the Livelihoods project looking at ways we can support and encourage the families in earning money and supporting their families.

The Livelihoods project still has a time frame attached to each family; time to learn the theory of how to run a business and money management skills, time to then actually run a successful business to be self sustainable and earn enough money to provide for their families.

Whilst we were working with these families we has instances where a boy in our school broke his leg (a collision with a motorbike), another boy in our school and his younger sister got very serious 3rd degree burns (the boy is still alive but the 1 year old girl died whilst Megan and I were in Uganda in August 2012), various children and members of their families were still getting ill with Malaria and other diseases.

We then started thinking about the project Health to help with these situations. With the aim to produce malaria nets, medical help from trained nurses and doctors, an emergency medical fund, which means we can pay for life saving treatment when there are serious illnesses and injuries with the families we work with. Education also plays a huge role in the health of the Katanga residents, so we look to address these issues in our school and Livelihoods program.

Our whole ethos at Hope for Life Katanga is to be a support to the families, helping them to earn money for themselves to be able to provide for their own families. The last thing we want to do is to give money to the families as we know this is a short term fix to a long term problem. The only exception is when a family we work with has a life threatening, or serious, illness or injury.

A huge part of bad health is dirty, stagnant Water being the main problem for diarrhoea, malaria, cholera, E.coli, typhoid, salmonella to name a few. For as long as people are forced to drink, bathe and live around dirty water then they continue to get ill. We are currently doing some research into the cleanliness of the water, before we know what to filter/safe guard against.